Crafting Great Scenes: Give Your Story a Pulse

So you finished NaNoWriMo.  Now what?  It’s time to revise.  Or maybe you haven’t started writing yet.  Either way, the key to a successful novel is in the scenes.  Each scene should tell its own story with a beginning, middle, and end.  It should have conflict and tension and move the story along.  And above all, it should have a pulse.

I recently finished a great book on crafting scenes called The Scene Book by Sandra Scofield.  Here are some highlights!

First, as an exercise to get you thinking about what makes up a good scene, try writing about a movie scene as you watch it.  This is a great way to deconstruct exactly what makes a scene work, all while enjoying your favorite movie 😉

What makes a scene come alive?  It must have a pulse.  The author defines a pulse as an emotional need or desire.  Tension arises from the pulse and is built from action.  You can imagine the pulse like a heart beating, a flame burning, or a key turning.  Fun!

Scofield provides a great example of a pulse using a story about an aspiring writer.  The ambition to be a writer is the pulse; but by neglecting everything else, there is a confrontation with the lover who says if things don’t change, then he will leave–that is tension!

You also want each scene to have a focal point, hot spot, or pivot.  Otherwise, the scene will be boring.  Think of it as the turning point where everything changes.  For example, the moment when the love interest walks in the room at a boring party.  Here’s a little math equation to help you remember:  Scene (Before X + After X) where X=focal point

Remember that each scene should involve some kind of conflict whether big or small and a resolution.  Keep in mind that conflict actually means power struggles and attempts at negotiation.  In each scene, always try to identify the balance of power.  Who has power and who doesn’t?  What does each character do to try to gain power in a given situation?

Another important element of a scene involves the use of images, which enhance a scene by creating a mood and revealing how a character experiences the world using the five senses.  We must see the world through the eyes of your point of view character and feel what he or she is feeling.

Also be aware of the emotions of your character and how they may change during the scene (i.e. from hope to sorrow).  This will help you create an emotional arc for your character throughout the story, so that he or she can grow and change.

And don’t forget to ask yourself: “Why have this scene?”  It should either reveal character or advance plot. If it does both, even better!

Just to recap.  How do you make a good story great?  One well-crafted scene at a time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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1 Comment (+add yours?)

  1. Dawne Webber
    Dec 09, 2015 @ 12:42:21

    You always find the best resources!

    Reply

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