Do We Need Magic to Create?

Greetings my dear readers,

I’ve been away for a while, busy with life, and probably will be again very soon.  More on that later.  But for now, I would like to share with you some wisdom I learned while reading a book by one of my favorite authors, Steven Pressfield. I first read his book The War of Art a few years back, which talks about fighting against “The Resistance” in order to pursue your creative work and accomplish your goals. He was referring to that inner critic inside your head that provides nothing but negative self-talk. That voice never goes away, but you can learn to quiet it and trust yourself.

I just finished reading another one of his books, Turning Pro, also excellent. Several passages struck me, but one really stood out, especially as it pertains to my word for the year: MAGIC. He talks throughout the book about the amateur vs. the professional mindset and how that can make all the difference. We must let go of self-doubt and procrastination by establishing discipline and striving for excellence. But one question remains.

What about the magic?

He’s referring to flashes of brilliance and moments where we feel the muse speaking directly to us.  Shouldn’t we wait for those moments? His answer is no.

“The monk glimpses the face of God not by scaling a peak in the Himalayas, but by sitting still in silence.”

This is not to say that we should do nothing. On the contrary, we should sit down in the chair every day and attempt to write, draw, design, etc. No matter how we’re feeling. No matter what is on our mind. Because eventually we’ll get there. But waiting around to get there isn’t going to make anything happen. Achieving a moment of greatness won’t do it. We’ll only be waiting for the next moment. But showing up in front of the silence of the blank page will. Every time we face that challenge, we’ll grow stronger, and be more likely to come back again and again to do the work. To make something happen.

“In order to achieve ‘flow,’ ‘magic,’ ‘the zone,’ we start by being common and ordinary and workmanlike. We set our palms against the stones in the garden wall and search, search, search until at last, in the instant when we’re ready to give up, our fingers fasten upon the secret door.”

I’m sure you’ve all experienced the magic moment before: The Flash of Greatness. But I’m calling on you to experience something more. It’s the same magic, but there’s another way in, which involves a little more searching, a little extra effort. You get there simply by starting. You’re in the tunnel, and it’s dark, lonely. But you dig anyway. Keep going. Claw your way through. Until you see a light. And before you know it, you’re in the zone, and you’re not even sure how you got there. But you know, if you did it once, you can do it again. Because you’re not waiting for it to show up. You’re going after it.

Find your magic. Find it every day. But don’t wait around for it to appear. All you have to do is begin. Start by playing. The magic will want to play too. It can’t resist. And before you know it, you will have created something unique, dynamic, and all your own. Not perfect, but something you can be proud of. Something born not out of a moment of greatness, but through patience and effort. And that which is created from such a hard-won battle is truly inspiring.

The True Value of Imagination

The City Museum in St. Louis, MO is like a giant playground for the imagination. Both children and the young at heart are welcome!

“She isn’t rich… She’s clever. That means she knows how to use her imagination. When you can do that, you can do anything.” –from The Land of Forgotten Girls by Erin Entrada Kelly

I don’t usually start a blog post with a quote, but this one really struck me. In fact, it’s the whole reason for the blog post. It reminds me of my childhood. Like most children, my sisters and I didn’t have every toy we wanted when we were growing up. Some kids might complain about that, and sometimes we probably did. But then something magical happened. We realized we could use our imaginations to create what we wanted.

We had this great big basement playroom, and luckily, our mom would let us do whatever we wanted with it, provided we clean it up every once in a while.  She called this “overhauling,” which usually meant giving some beloved but never used old toys and junk away.  Anyway, we had toys, games, and craft items down there.  Usually I’d convince my younger sister to join me for some fun, as our older sister was often “too cool” for us, doing mysterious older sister things in her room.

Sometimes we’d rearrange our old toys into something new, making castles for our toy figures out of chairs, kitchen stove sets, plastic telephones, toy cash registers, and the like.  Other times, we’d see toys we wanted on TV and decide to create them ourselves. Toilet paper and paper towel roll tubes turned into action figures.  Cut-out watercolor drawings of kids turned into paper dolls.  We even invented things and conducted experiments.

Other times, especially in the summer, we’d make a tent out of tables, chairs, and blankets, sleeping inside it every night.  I also invented something called “the boat game,” where we had 5 minutes to gather everything we could (toys, games, etc.) and get onto the boat (i.e. bed or couch) before it sailed away.  Then we’d play with all our stuff there, which was much more exciting than simply playing with it at the table or on the floor.  We were on an adventure! My favorite part and probably my sister’s least favorite was when I would nudge her off the bed and say, “Oh you fell into the sea!  Now I have to rescue you!”  Then I’d slowly pull her back up to safety 😉

I hope kids these days still find time to use their imagination.  More importantly, I hope they understand what imagination is and that its value far exceeds the worth of any toys, video games, or electronics they might have.  As an adult, your imagination can take you places too.  You learn resourcefulness and how to carefully use your resources.  You come up with creative problem-solving.  You find solutions where you otherwise might not.  And let’s face it, imagination is just plain fun!  It’s what gives us hope and provides a means of entertainment and escape from reality, even if just for a while.

For me, my imagination is what has allowed me to become a children’s writer and illustrator.  I use it when I conduct storytime for the kids at the library.  And it fills me with a sense of wonder whenever I travel, visit a park, or go to an art gallery.  Imagination keeps me young at heart, and I wouldn’t trade that for all the money in the world.

Have you used your imagination recently?  What is it worth to you?  Please share!

 

 

March Magic!

Happy March everyone!  It sure is coming in like a lion 😉  But I’ve never been more excited about it.  I’m very happy to see February go, mostly because it means spring is right around the corner.

I started thinking about the best way to welcome a new month and the coming of a new season.  How about with some magic!

I recently read a great article online titled, “33 Ways to Invite & Invoke More Magic Into Your Life” by Kara Maria Ananda, a Healing Arts Educator, Holistic Business Coach, Speaker and Writer.  I’d like to highlight a few of my favorites, some of which I plan to focus on for this year.

  • Drink more water.
  • Dance, stretch, do yoga and move your body.
  • Play with children.
  • Go somewhere new in your own town.
  • Pay attention to synchronicity.
  • Get a massage.
  • Meditate.
  • Leave secret notes with positive messages in public places for people to find.
  • Make art.
  • Read your favorite books from your childhood.
  • Walk barefoot on the Earth.
  • Get all dressed up just because.

Check out Ananda’s article to find out even more ways to cultivate magic in your life.

And here are a few magical quotes from some books I’ve been reading lately.  The first is from a book I just started called The Charmed Children of Rookskill Castle by Janet Fox.  The other two quotes are from the 2017 Newbery-winning book, The Girl Who Drank the Moon by Kelly Barnhill, which I highly recommend.  The quotes from these books take two very different tones but they intersect in interesting ways, just like everything in life.

“In times like these, according to Great-Aunt Margaret, magic bubbled up, rising out of the confusion and strife of war.  Troubled times stirred up magic like dumplings in a stew.”

“And there was something else, too.  This surging feeling in her bones.  This clicking inside her head.  This feeling as though she had an invisible gear inside her, pushing her, inch by inch, towards…something.  Her whole life, she never knew what.  Magic, her bones said.”

“Her grandmother had taught Luna…how a caterpillar lives, growing big and fat and sweet-tempered, until it forms a chrysalis.  And inside the chrysalis, it changes.  Its body unmakes.  Every portion of itself unravels, unwinds, undoes, and reforms into something else…  “It feels like magic,” her grandmother had said…”

Magic is my word for the year, so it is always fun to see where it pops up.  I think everyone can use a little more magic in their lives.  It’s that spark that makes life meaningful and gives us hope.

How will you invite magic into your life this month?  Please share!

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Love Me” Owl

Happy Valentine’s Day, my dear readers!  I thought I would share a new piece of artwork that is near and dear to my heart.  How many of you are familiar with The Love-Me Bird, a picture book by Joyce Dunbar?

I love this story, which is about a little songbird who goes around calling out, “Love me! Love-me!” in search of her perfect mate.  Well, she never gets a response, which is sad at first.  But then she decides to change her tune to “Love you! Love-you!”  Before you know it, she finds her true love.

This is such a great message.  It’s easy to have expectations, especially on a day like today.  Everyone wants to be loved.  But it’s often the love you give away that comes back to you.

Today and every day, I hope you feel loved.  But don’t forget to share your love with others.  You just might find what you’re looking for ❤

 

Tidying Up = Letting Go = Inviting Miracles

A new year is all about a fresh start, right? Well, what better way to start off the year 2016 than by cleaning up around the house.  Sounds kind of boring, doesn’t it?  I thought so too, until I read The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo.  Actually, my husband and I listened to it on audio. We both have a habit of holding onto our possessions, long after they cease being of value to us. But what good is it to be surrounded by so many things that you aren’t even sure which things you like and use and which things are just there simply because you can’t let go of them or, worse yet, forgot they even exist.

Ms. Kondo wrote this New York Times bestselling self-help book on tidying primarily for Japanese people who need to organize small living spaces, but the book has taken the world by storm and its popularity continues to grow.  Why?  Let me share some of the great tips and insights I learned from this book that changed the way I view cleaning and organizing. Don’t be surprised if you suddenly feel like tidying up your space too.  The best part is, if you tidy all at once now and really put your things in order, you’ll never have to tidy again. What could be more appealing than the idea of never having to spend time straightening up or decluttering again?

First things first. Know that you will come away from this experience  with more than just a tidy house.  This book promotes cleaning as a way of restoring balance to your life.  How cool is that?

Here are just some of the ways tidying up will affect your life:

–The moment you start, you reset your life.

–You discover what you were really meant to do in life.

–You surround yourself only with those things truly important to you.

–Letting go allows more good things to come into your life.

–You gain confidence in your decision-making ability.

–You become more zen.

–You can truly see what you have and appreciate it.

–Your health and vitality often improve (like a detox).

–You are forced to confront your choices, which is cathartic.

–Tidying can increase good fortune.

Tips

–If you tidy only a little each day, you’ll be tidying forever.

Apparently my mom had it right years ago when she had my sisters and I “overhaul” our basement/play room rather than just straighten it up.  But at such a young age, I couldn’t fully appreciate this concept.  To us, “overhaul” simply meant getting rid of some of our favorite toys (and they were all our favorites), never mind we were probably too old for some of them and didn’t play with half of what was down there.

–Ask if something truly brings you joy.

–Remember everything wants to be useful.

This means that if you are holding onto a vase that you don’t like because your Great Aunt Zelda who passed away gave it to you, but you never use it or take it out of the box, then it isn’t serving its purpose.  Give it away and let it “spark joy” for someone else.

–Realize that some items fulfill their purpose the moment you receive them or purchase them.

You know that sweater you bought that made your bad day better but ended up not looking that good on you?  It’s ok to discard it.

–Most items are kept based on an attachment to the past or anxiety about the future.  Keep only that which reflects and supports who you are today.

–If you discarded something useful, you can usually recover it or get over it.

–Own only what you love and need.

–Organizing is not the same as decluttering, so discard first and then organize what you have left.

–Declutter by category, not place.

–Best order of decluttering: clothes, then books, then papers, then misc.  Save mementos for last.

Feng shui is about living in accordance with nature, so put your house in order in a pleasing way that makes sense for your life.

Favorite quotes from this book:

“One theme underlying my method of tidying is transforming the home into a sacred space, a power spot filled with pure energy.”

“The lives of those who tidy thoroughly and completely, in a single shot, are without exception dramatically altered.”

Real World Application:

My husband and I put the KonMari method to the test.  Last weekend we started by cleaning out our closets, first realizing that we had clothes in several closets but with no apparent order whatsoever.  I would say between the two of us, we’ll probably discard at least 6 bags.  And we still have all the clothes we want and need, now arranged all together in a satisfying way. So all I can say is, what’s next?

As for you, I recommend you go out and get this book.  But don’t take it from me.  Try it for yourself.  If you want to get your life in order, start by getting your house in order.  See what happens.  Trust that by letting go, the release of energy will come back to you in a new and surprising way at just the right moment.  Maybe in the form of a miracle.

PS: Stay tuned for more results from me about this life-changing experience!

 

 

 

Plotting vs. Pantsing

The age-old question for novel writers regarding how they work:

Are you a plotter or a pantser?  It sounds funny, but writers really do fall into one of two categories.  They usually make a detailed plotline before they write and then follow it, sometimes allowing for a little serendipity.  OR they write by the seat of their pants, meaning they write as they go, following the muse wherever it leads.  Then there’s the plotser.  I believed myself to fall into this category, as I always know the beginning and end of my story as well as some major plot points, critical scenes, and the climax.

But which one is right for writing?

Truly, either style CAN work.  What I’ve learned over time is that the pantser tends to have more freedom in the beginning but will have more work after the first draft.  The plotter takes more time to choreograph all the details ahead of time, but ends up with a more polished first draft.

So really, what you want to ask yourself is whether you want more work after you write (pantser) or more work before you write (plotter).  Either way, there is significant work involved! 😉

For plotting tips, I recommend reading Outlining Your Novel by K. M. Weiland.  The author makes plotting seem like an organic process.  It’s not so much about roman numerals and bullet points but more about figuring out what drives the narrative and building around that.  You basically keep a notebook of the details you do know in the order in which they happen and then just keep building on that until you connect all the dots.  Ask yourself a lot of questions and write in a stream of consciousness format, allowing for many different possibilities to unfold.  By doing this now, you’re more likely to figure out plot holes and fix them instead of writing yourself into a corner.  You’ll also quickly notice where your story lacks tension.

One great suggestion the author offers when you get stuck is to consider working backwards.  If you know what happens at the climax and you know one of the major events leading up to it, but you don’t know what happens in-between, you can use the climax as a springboard.  Meaning, think about what is necessary for the climax to occur, ask yourself some questions, and you will likely discover ways to lead up to this point.  That way you are less likely to add random, meaningless events just to fill space from point A to point B.

Once you get to the level of crafting individual scenes, consider Darcy Pattison’s advice on her popular blog, Fiction Notes.  In her post entitled “My 4000 Word Day: Prewriting,” she says, “Scenes need a beginning, middle, end; add in conflict and a pivot or turning point; stir with some great emotional development.”

Consider using a set of index cards and have one per scene.  Identify the POV, 3 reasons for each scene (i.e. character, theme, plot/subplot advancement), the number of pages, and on which day in your story the scene takes place (from your timeline or story calendar).  You can also rearrange the cards to determine the best scene progression.

Now if you insist on pantsing, which is OK, you might try these tips that I learned at Detcon, the North American Science Fiction Convention held in Detroit last summer.  When you get blocked, try using tarot cards, especially a literary archetypes deck.  You can also consider collaging ideas or creating a mind map.  You want to at least have a broad story arc and know up to 2 or 3 scenes ahead.  The voice is key, so try to nail that within the first 10,000 words before moving on.

The coolest thing I discovered about detailed plotting is how it actually heightens creativity rather than stifles it.  You’re still making up every detail from your imagination.  I would argue you can actually keep the flow going more easily at this stage, because you aren’t also focused on language and crafting the perfect sentences.  Furthermore, plotting reduces the anxiety of sitting down to write, since now you have a guide to follow.  Every sailer needs a map, even if you plan to go off course every once in a while.

So plot the course of your novel, and prepare to sail through your first draft with unexpected ease!

Meditating with Mandalas

As you know, my new favorite thing is working with mandalas.  I started out by coloring them as a way to meditate on a specific idea and person with the  intention of giving the finished piece as a gift to that person.  See my post here.

Today I want to share a new book that I recently purchased.  I found it at a local bookstore in Columbus…or rather, it found me 🙂

It’s beautifully illustrated and features various mandalas, differing in color and design, to help aid in meditation on a variety of topics.  Some of them are health related, like heart or fatigue.  Others are more meditative, like releasing stress and connecting to nature.

The key is to stare at the mandala for several minutes absorbing all the colors, symbols, and energy.  Then follow the guided meditation to its conclusion.

And the results?  You definitely feel better afterward!  And you feel more in control of your life.  We can’t always control what happens to us, but we can control how we respond to it.  You always have the power to transform yourself and your way of thinking!

 

Daily Quote: Goals

Spring has sprung dear readers!

I recently finished reading author Kwame Alexander’s Newbery-winning novel in verse The Crossover.  I thought I would share with you one of my favorite quotes from the poem entitled “Basketball Rule #3.”

“Never let anyone lower your goals.  Others’ expectations of you are determined by their limitations of life.  The sky is your limit, sons.  Always shoot for the sun and you will shine.”

Happy Friday 🙂

 

 

Little Infinity

Over the summer I had a chance to read the popular YA romance novel The Fault in Our Stars by John Green.  I’m not usually a fan of YA or romance or death stories, because it is so easy to fall into sappy cliché.  But this story is also literary and very philosophical, which I like, and not in the hum drum ways you might expect.

At the end of chapter 20, the book states that there are infinite numbers between 0 and 1.

The main character goes on to say, “I cannot tell you how thankful I am for our little infinity.  I wouldn’t trade it for the world.  You gave me a forever within the numbered days, and I’m grateful.”

So my question to you is this:  What will you do with your little infinity?

Interview with Author Tim Loge and Giveaway!

Freebooter's Paradise by Tim Loge

Freebooter’s Paradise by Tim Loge

I’m celebrating self-publishing this week and had the pleasure of interviewing author Tim Loge about his book Freebooter’s Paradise.   You can read my review of his book on goodreads, but for now, just imagine a pirate ship coming to town on dust devils!  I first became acquainted with Tim when I interviewed author/illustrator Denise Fleming.  He shared photos of her story park on behalf of the Sanger Branch Library in Toledo, OH where he is a children’s librarian.  I was excited to meet a fellow librarian, especially one who is also a middle grade fantasy writer like me!  Enjoy his interview.  Watch out for pirates 😉     

How long have you been writing?

Back when I was in 3rd Grade, our local newspaper, The Toledo Blade, held a coloring contest. The winners received free tickets to see a marionette show. As luck would have it, I won; I remember my Mom and I thoroughly enjoying the show. Well, for months afterward I had written and performed marionette shows for all of the neighborhood kids. We set up benches in my garage and from the attic a couple of us dangled down homemade marionettes onto a makeshift stage. Of course I needed help, so everyone in the audience usually participated in some way or another, maybe as an usher or a second act puppeteer. Boy, did we have a lot of fun! Back then we thought our shows were spectacular, but I remember the marionettes weren’t. They were a stringy mess of painted cardboard. Honestly though, I think that was when I was bitten by the story bug. As for writing proper stories, that had to wait ‘til I started working on my Agricultural Degree at the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada. How I found time to study and write I don’t know because I was in class 38 hours every week. That meant I had to spend at least that much time doing homework. Writing stories was a joy while earning my Creative Writing degree from the University of Victoria in British Columbia, Canada.

What made you want to become a children’s author?

J. K. Rowling. Her Harry Potter stories have engaged children and adults in a way that makes them want to read more. How many kids read today because of Rowling? The Harry Potter novels are:

  • Fun
  • Adventurous
  • Scary
  • Relaxing

Her characters are friends you miss after you finish reading the series. It almost feels like you have lost some close friends. Now, that’s magic I wish to create!

You self-published your book.  Why did you decide to take this route and would you ever consider traditional publishing?

Unless you’re a celebrity or a darling to someone in the publishing industry, you will never be a shoe-in to get published. In fact, finding someone to seriously look at your work can be very hard. Most of the time it’s college students surfing the slush piles of manuscripts that publishers receive. College students? Yep. So, does that mean anything original and unfamiliar will probably be ignored? Maybe. I’ve heard, and have grown to believe, that attending a writing conference is a good way to get proper exposure for you and your story, and I plan on attending more of those myself. I self-published Freebooter’s Paradise as an eBook first. eBooks are exciting creatures right now. I uploaded my novel to Barnes & Noble, Amazon, Apple, and Smashwords on September 5th, which just happens to be Jessie James’ birthday. How cool is that: being that Jessie James was sort of a pirate in his day? The problem with eBooks for me was that kids knew what eReaders were, but a lot of them didn’t have access to them. So, it looked like I needed to print my novel to get my story out. The way I went about printing it was by creating a project on the crowd sourcing company called Kickstarter. The project is still on their website. Go check it out.

Self-publishing is very trendy these days.  Can you tell us a little bit about the process?  Did you hire your own editor?  Find your own cover artist?  Handle the layout and design?

Ah yes, I had to do everything. I hired an editor, and then another and another. I commissioned an artist, contracted a printer, and secured an ISBN number. I contacted schools and book stores for visits. Would I do it all again? Yes, it was a blast! Do traditionally published authors understand exactly what has happened for their stories to become books? I bet most do, but not many have done it all by themselves. My plan, after getting picked up by a major publisher, is to become the best team player/author a publisher has EVER come across. I KNOW what has to be done to create a book, and I will so much appreciate their help! I also know I still have much more to learn about the whole industry; I have so much more to give. Catch me if you can…

In what ways have you promoted your book?

Like I mentioned earlier, I visit stores and schools. Both are fun adventures, but the school visits are the most fun. I usually sell more books there too. I also meet really awesome librarians and reviewers like you, Angie.  I’m so happy you enjoyed Freebooter’s Paradise!

Now let’s talk about the story itself.  How did you come up with the idea?  Were you always interested in pirates?  Did you do a lot of research on the topic?

Yes, I love pirates! But, let’s start here: I’m also a big fan of Rick Riordan’s novel The Lightning Thief. I loved the fact that reluctant readers enjoyed its quick pace and ton of adventures. So, I decided to write a story in that same style. When I started Freebooter’s Paradise there were only a couple of middle grade novels which took place in the Superstition Mountains or The Lost Dutchman’s Gold Mine. Nothing modern anyway, and no one had considered flying pirates to Arizona, let alone Captain Blackbeard, who has been dead for centuries! Yes, I did research, but after all, it’s a made-up story. I stayed true to what I needed to, and then, I did what authors do best—I made up the rest. Haha!

Some people say my family is related to Captain Kidd 😉  Who is your favorite pirate and why?

I’m thrilled you’re related to Captain Kidd! Apparently his blood line has grown large over the years. You all should hold a family reunion. I bet you would get TV news coverage, if not the History Channel. Personally, I have great sympathy for Captain Kidd. He was an excellent Privateer, a private citizen who hunted ships of the enemy (like you know), but through political maneuvers and King’s favors he ended up an enemy of the King. Ugh. Look for Captain Kidd as a villain in my book two of Dangerous Tandem Adventures. He might finally get what’s his, after being Blackbeard’s lackey in their magical new lives. Where Kidd’s real life story is interesting, Captain Blackbeard is my favorite pirate for a lot of reasons. First, I couldn’t imagine lighting a fuse in my hair just to look menacing. That’s not because I don’t have much hair, ahem, but just because. I mean: Who puts fire near their face? Let alone in their beard/hair? Secondly, according to most pirate historians, Edward Teach (or Thatch) 1680 – 22 November 1718 was the most famous Pirate King of the Caribbean, and only for two years 1716-1718. I use the term ‘Pirate King,’ but he wasn’t called that then. After all these years, he’s remembered to be the fiercest of pirates. Shipping Captains would just give up when they found out Blackbeard’s ship was chasing them. Have you seen Captain Blackbeard’s flag? Talk about creepy. Not only is it a skeleton stabbing a heart ‘til it bleeds, it’s the skeleton of a devil! And it’s holding a time piece in its other hand, sort of saying, “Your time’s up, Matey!”

You chose an interesting setting for your pirates—the desert.  What made you choose Arizona as the location for this story?

I chose that setting because I love Arizona, and at the time there weren’t a lot of middle grade stories set there. I wouldn’t say so now, lots of stories now, but in any case, the American Southwest is an amazing place. Everyone, please go visit it someday; you’ll see. Also, I enjoyed the idea of pirates finding a gold mine. Would they mine it? Or would it be too hard for them? After all, they’re pirates. They enjoy stealing! LOL

I read on your blog that you hiked in Northern Spain.  Tell us about that experience.

I’ve hiked The Way of Saint James three times now. That’s an ancient Christian pilgrimage. One can actually start anywhere in Europe and walk their way to The Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela. Usually most folks start in Southern France and hike across the Pyrenees, through Pamplona, Burgos, and Leon all the way to the Cathedral where the bones of Saint James the Greater are buried. If you do that, you’ll have hiked 500 miles. I never thought I could do such a thing, but what strength I’ve gained from it for my body, mind, and heart. And really, isn’t everything in life about the heart? I made friends from all over the world. Would I do it a fourth time? You bet!

You’re also a librarian.  How has that helped or influenced your writing?

I’m a Children’s Librarian, so I probably read too much middle grade fiction! They’re at least fun stories, and most of the time enlightening, unlike other genres. Maybe I have a leg up in writing because middle graders tell me what they like or don’t like about stories. They share titles they enjoy with me all of the time. From that, I try to build good, fun stories. It’s a challenge, but it has been a fun adventure for me.

What’s up next?  What are you working on now?  A sequel perhaps?

Yes, definitely! I’m working now on book two of the Dangerous Tandem Adventures. I’m also working on a teen and an adult novel. I have lots in the works actually. I’d be thrilled to have you, Angie, be an advance reader for book two! What do you think? Thank you again, for taking a chance on reading Freebooter’s Paradise. Cheers!

***To celebrate, I’m giving away a signed copy of this book!  For a chance to win, leave a comment on this post either about the interview or the blog or both.  Also include your name and email so I can contact you, if you win 🙂  You must reside in the U.S. to be eligible.

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