Postcard Art for Charity

postcard art for charity at #twitterartexhibit in Orlando

Here’s a look at some of the postcard art displayed at the #twitterartexhibit in Orlando.  All of these works have been donated from artists around the world to benefit The Center for Contemporary Dance, Special Needs Students.  Postcards are still available to purchase online until April 11th.  The postcards have a set price of $35 plus $7 for shipping and 100% of donations go to the above named charity.

My entry is posted on the bottom right, 4th one over at the top.  You can view and purchase it here.  You can also check out other amazing postcard art for purchase.  See my previous post for further details.

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#twitterartexhibit 2014 in Orlando

hand-dyed paper, collage, and ink

I’m very excited to introduce a new piece of art that will be part of an international group art exhibition in Orlando, FL this year.  This show features postcard art from all over the world and will benefit The Center for Contemporary Dance, Special Needs Students.  It runs from March 20 – April 11, 2014.  You can check out the awesome entries online.

Although there is no theme, some people chose to honor the art of dance.  I originally titled my piece Japanese Fans.  But do you notice anything special about the fans?  First of all, they’re all cut from different paper, symbolizing the unique identify of each individual.  What about the placement of the fans on the postcard?  Do you feel a sense of movement?  Like they might just dance off the page?  I hope so!  That’s why I decided to rename them Dancing Japanese Fans.  But for the exhibition, they will be labeled with the original title.  That way the message will be open for viewers to interpret.  Whatever people take away from the piece is fine, but I hope they will see that despite our differences in appearance and ability, we are all united by dance 🙂 

As to the process, I wanted to reflect my connection to and affinity for Japanese culture.  The fan shapes were cut from papers that I hand-dyed myself using liquid watercolor and a Japanese folding technique.  Then I created a collage with the fans and added ink as a final touch.  Voila!

The Japanese Fan Dance has been around for centuries.  Although the fans originally represented high social status, they now symbolize friendship and are often exchanged as signs of good will and respect for one another.    

Japanese fans are considered highly symbolic, with the handle of the fan representing birth and the blades symbolizing many possible paths in life.  What path will you take in life?  Will you hide behind your fan?  Consider letting your unique self show and maybe even dance!