A House for Dreaming Big Dreams

collage, acrylic, ink

Greetings, My Lovelies ūüôā

Happy Almost-Friday! ¬†I’ve decided to share with you another new art piece that I’m excited about. ¬†This piece helped fuel my inspiration and basically makes me happy every time I look at it. ¬†It opened doorways that allowed me to re-envision an ongoing art project that I put aside for quite some time. ¬†Yata!

What I love about the technology age is that there has never been a better time to be an artist. ¬†Why? ¬†Because we have access to so many styles and tutorials at our fingertips. ¬†No longer must one simply go to an expensive art school to learn traditionally. ¬†There is certainly nothing wrong with going the traditional route, but in today’s fast-paced, modern world, not everyone has time or money for this. ¬†Even if they do, everyone can benefit from additional education and opportunities for growth.

I learned this collage technique from artist¬†nicoletta zanella¬†in this video. ¬†I encourage you to go online and find some art classes or web videos to watch. ¬†Engage. ¬†Be curious. ¬†Take on a new challenge. ¬†See where it takes you and how you can incorporate it into your own personal style. ¬†And in the end, you may find that you’ve expanded your world and you can be more YOU.

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Go to the Well

People go to wells for many reasons– water…wishes…words?

I enjoy receiving book recommendations.¬† Recently someone suggested On Writing Well ¬†by William Zinsser.¬† Since it’s a guide for nonfiction writing, I paused before picking it up.¬† But then I thought, why not?¬† Thank goodness I did.¬† Turns out the wisdom found in its pages works for all kinds of writers.

Here are some highlights!

“Ultimately the product that any writer has to sell is not the subject being written about, but who he or she is.”

When writing, go in search of humanity and warmth.¬† “Good writing has an aliveness that keeps the reader reading…”

My favorite chapter is titled “Clutter.”¬† Follow this advice to help declutter your writing.

  • Don’t follow a verb with a preposition (“order up”)
  • Don’t add an adverb when the verb itself does the job (“smile happily”)
  • Don’t add an adjective that states a known fact (“tall skyscraper”)
  • Avoid¬†using qualifiers that weaken the sentence (“a bit,” “sort of”)
  • Avoid¬†using phrases that don’t mean anything (“in a sense”)
  • Avoid following up a sentence with another sentence that essentially says the same thing.¬† (You can also cut sentences that give info readers don’t really need to know or can figure out on their own.)

Astonishing fact: “Most first drafts can be cut by 50 percent without losing any information or losing the author’s voice.”

***How do we get our own style?***

Trick question!¬† “First…learn to hammer the nails, and if what you build is sturdy and serviceable, take satisfaction in its plain strength.”

If anything, “Sell yourself…Believe in your own identity and your own opinions.¬† Writing is an act of ego…Use its energy to keep yourself going.”

Here’s some advice on fear and confidence from humorist S. J. Perelman.¬† “The reader has to feel that the writer is feeling good…Even if he isn’t.”

“Writers have to jump-start themselves at the moment of performance, no less than actors and dancers and painters and musicians…You also have to [be the one to] turn on the switch.¬† Nobody is going to do it for you.”

And what’s my new mantra from this book?¬† “Get on the plane.”¬† You never know where your words will take you.¬† But they won’t take you anywhere, unless you have the courage to write them.